Jess said 6 years, 6 months ago:

There are more sexual orientations and gender identities than the few portrayed in mainstream media. There are dozens that have names, and hundreds and thousands more that do not have names. Sexual attraction and gender identity fall on spectrums, more than one for each, and everyone is different so it’s impossible to give a name to every single variation, but more and more are being coined up to help us understand, explain, and describe ourselves. Labels are generally just names of common characteristics for us to use to help us describe who we are, to ourselves and to others and this post aims to spread awareness of as many as possible.

If you know of any not listed, comment them below.

Sexual Orientations:

Androsexual/Androphilic: a person attracted to masculinity, but not nessisarily men or males.

Asexual: a person with little or no sexual attraction to others, but may still experience sexual arousal.

Autosexual: a person who prefers masturbation to sexual intercourse and/or are sexually attracted to themselves.

Bisexual: a person attracted to men and women.

Demisexual: a person who does not experience sexual attraction to another person unless they have an emotional connection first.

Fluid-sexual(ity): a person whose sexual preference and/or attraction often fluctuates and does not stay as one defined sexual orientation.

Gay: a man primarily or only attracted to other men, also often used by women to describe their same-sex attraction. Often used as an umbrella term for the LGTQ+ community.

Gray-asexual: a person who can experience a small amount of sexual attraction/sex drive towards other people.

Gynesexual/Gynephilic: a person attracted to femininity, but not nessisarily women or females.

Homosexual: a person attracted to the same sex/gender.

Lesbian: a woman who is primarily or only attracted to other women.

Omnisexual: a person who does not have a sexual preference and may be attracted to everyone equally (very similar and occasionally identical to pansexual).

Pansexual: a person attracted to people regardless of their gender identity.

Polysexual: a person attracted to more than two genders (beyond man and women), but not necessarily all.

Pomosexual: a person who doesn’t identify with conventional sexualities and/or does not name their sexual orientation.

Queer: a person who experiences same-sex attraction and acknowledges it without identifying with a conventional sexuality, may or may not fit other sexual orientations. Also used an an “umbrella term” for the LGBTQ+ community.

Same Gender Loving (SGL): a phrase coined by the African American/Black queer community, used as an alternative for “gay” and “lesbian” by people who may see those as terms of the White queer community.

Skoliosexual: a person attracted to genderqueer* and trans*gender people.

Gender Identity:

A-gender/Genderless: a person who does not identify with any gender.

Androgyny: gender expression that has elements of both masculinity and femininity, occasionally used to describe a person with both female and male anatomy (intersex).

Bigender: a person who feels they are a man and a woman and fluctuates between masculine and feminine identities.

Cisgender: a person whose gender identity/expression, and biological sex align (a man, biological male).

Genderqueer/Gender-fluid: a person whose gender falls outside of the gender binary of man or women.

Intersex: a person whose biological sex does not fit within male or female.

Third Gender: a person who does not identify with the traditional genders of man or woman, but identifies with another gender. Used in societies that recognize three or more genders.

Transgender: a person whose gender identity does not align with their biological sex. An umbrella term used to describe the gender identity/expression of non-cisgender people.

Transsexual: a person whose gender identity does not align with their biological sex and may receive medical treatment to change their biological sex to their gender identity (similar and occasionally identical to transgender).

Trans-man: a person who identifies as a man, but was not born biologically male.

Trans-woman: a person who identifies as a woman, but was not born biologically female.

Two-Spirit: a term traditionally used by Native American people to recognize individuals who possess qualities or fulfill roles of both genders (man and woman).

Caroline said 6 years, 6 months ago:

Does the advent of continuous technology exposure to today’s youth lead them to feel like they are pressured to have an abnormal sexuality, or that they feel like they must fit into an abnormal sexuality (aka not straight, any kind of queer?) or begin to choose their sexuality or gender expression?

alex said 6 years, 6 months ago:

caroline, i can see where you get that idea. the mainstream world is finally being exposed to all of the different,”hidden” sides of the human condition that, until now, have been either ignored or written off as “deviant” because of their apparent rarity. and i do understand that many of these ideas are all coming through at the same time, mostly in the form of very vague and misinformed blog posts. but i have to raise one question- how do you identify?

i’m not asking this to be rude, but to look for a genuine reflection. of course everybody has their moments of questioning, but most people feel confident in saying that they’re heterosexual, cisgender individuals. it doesn’t feel right for them to be called by different pronouns than the ones they’ve always been called. in fact, it would feel downright disturbing. what you have to remember is people with non-binary genders or sexualities feel the exact same way. i understand that these ideas seem to be popular or even “trendy” lately, but keep in mind that these labels are profound. the decision to use them is never taken lightly. and if somebody comes out, you can be assured that it’s been weighing (VERY heavily) on their mind for a very long time. and also that coming out brings on a whole level of adversity that nobody would choose to face unless it really meant something truly important to them.

Hannah said 6 years, 6 months ago:

I am confused. I am a girl. I have dated guys and girls. I have been sexually involved with guys and girls. I am in a relationships with a guy I love and I have been with him for almost 2 years, but my problem is, I feel like I am more attracted to girls and would rather be with a girl. I would never want to leave him but for some reason I like girls more than guys.. is that wrong? I feel so guilty that he is the only guy inreslly find myself attracted to but there are many girls that I am like omg your beautiful I wish you were mine (I only think that) but I dont with they were mine. Im sorry if thats confusing..

Jess said 6 years, 6 months ago:

I made this post to help others who feel lost because they’re not gay, bisexual, or straight, showing that there’s a huge world of other sexualities, not to make a list so people can just pick one and decide to be it, because that doesn’t happen. Knowing that how you have been feeling has a name and is okay and we need to stop thinking that you either like the opposite sex, the same-sex, or both sexes equally and that’s all you can be and if you’re not that, you’re really weird or wrong about your own feelings. Being validated feels good.

Jess said 6 years, 6 months ago:

@Hannah, it’s totally okay to have a preference, even if you aren’t dating someone who is your preference. Being more attracted to one gender (while attracted to more than one) doesn’t mean you don’t like the other gender. It’s just like if you were more attracted to guys than girls and you see a guy and think “hot damn, you are fine, 10/10 would bang”, there’s nothing wrong with acknowledging your attraction to other people, regardless of their gender. It’s only when you’re not attracted to your partner is when you should consider where you really want to be.

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