How to deal with anxiety as a teenager?

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Right now I’m studying for my alevels. I have completed most of my exams for AS level and they have gone well, better than my GCSE’s, where I suffered anxiety. I have been ok but I’m still trying to pass my GCSE maths and its my third time now and everytime I try to revise I’m so scared, scared of failure or not knowing. That constant thought of failure is always with me and I know it is effecting me as I have been having symptoms what I had last year. I’m just feeling confused about everything and would appreciated some kind advice

asked May 31, 2013

4 Answers

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Hi, so I actually am a teen suffering from anxiety as well and though I don't recognize what those tests are I might be able to offer you some advice about both test anxiety and anxiety in general.While you are studying for your test if you start to feel majorly anxious, get up, walk around for a second, get a drink of water, listen to music, sit back down. Just distract yourself for a second and try to reset. You're not going to get anything done if you're stressing. Also, try studying smarter, psych studies have shown if you study right before sleeping you retain the information better. Using study techniques like this you might be more confident going into the testing room knowing you studied the best you could. The morning of a test I listen to classical music to calm me down. I only eat healthy foods , limiting my sugar intake which might make me jittery. I wear my friendship bracelets because playing with them can calm me down, or any jewelry works just as well. But if you're a guy/not into jewelry you can try writing a short message to yourself on your hand like 'relax' or 'breathe' this works for me too. (except i'm kinda weird and I write Latin things like alis grave neil - nothing is heavy to those with wings)Okay, anxiety in general. 1. Tell someone you trust about your anxiety and ask them to help you out when you need it. (help you calm down, help you escape a situation, or just talk to) 2. I tap together my index finger and thumb when i feel anxious and that seems to relieve it a bit. You could always try that. 3. Tensing and releasing your muscles one by one may work as well. 4. Make sure you exercise enough. I can't stress this enough. It works wonders, reduces the stress, and its hard to stress and feel anxious when doing a hard work out. 5. Create a chart. On one side of the chart, write down what makes you feel anxious (your tests, other school stuff, social stuff, etc). On the other side of the chart decide what you will do to combat the feelings, whether it is coping techniques, or avoid the situation all together. 6. Again, Eat healthy. EAT EVERY FOUR HOURS AT LEAST. I don't remember where I heard it but it definitely works! 7. It is important to keep the brain occupied on anything but the anxiety. A game I like to use is the random word game. to play it, think of a random word. Allow that word to remind you of another word. And that new word to make you think of another word. So on and so forth, (example: shark, water, blue, red, fire truck, toy, Christmas, Easter bunny, eggs, chocolate cake, etc.) you thoughts will start flowing from one word to another and allow no room for anxiety. Once you hit a word that triggers your anxiety, you should stop immediately and start over. I hope this helped a little! Good luck!
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One way to help cope with anxiety is to think postitive. Wish, dream, and think of what will happen in the future with your dreams and desires. Another way is to help is to listen to relaxing music or go for a nice walk outside, drink some nice warm tea or chat with a friend.
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I have been dealing with anxiety for awhile and what seems to help me in those times of stress and confusion, it's going to sound silly, but take a deep breath and talk to yourself for a second. Sometimes the anxious feeling becomes so overwhelming that we actually forget about reality for a bit. When I get scared about failing or that I won't do something right or know the right answer, I ask myself, "Ok, what will actually happen if I do fail?" or "What will happen if I don't know the answer?" The answers to these questions usually are that I would have to retake the test or that nothing would happen at all. I would just end up disappointed in myself. But the most important part is reminding yourself that IT IS OK TO FAIL or IT IS OK TO NOT KNOW. It makes us human. I have to remind myself of this all the time. I know it feels like the world will end if you fail, but I promise you, it won't. Failing also doesn't make you a bad person. So don't get down on yourself for that. Just some people take failure or not knowing harder than others. Know that you aren't the only one who experiences this kind of thing. And it's going to be ok. I promise you. Just breathe. Reassure yourself. And just get through it. Do the best that you can, because that is all you can do. And know that all you can do is just enough. I hope this wasn't too cheesy or confusing. I hope it can help.
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I am 21, still with anxiety and depression. First and foremost thing I recommend is called self-regulation. Self-regulation is essentially controlling your emotions; now I can hear you saying that it is impossible/very difficult. It is tricky yes, but it is very possible, and it can get you out of a tight spot. Deep breathing and loud music have always personally helped me.

If the feelings get really overwhelming, I recommend that you simply stop what you are doing (if able), and go do something else that takes a lot of attention for a little while. I've also heard it mentioned that you should challenge the idea that you MUST always come out on top; that is great to hear! I also read keeping yourself healthy, and that is awesome too. Rock on guys.